2020/21 Tom Davies

OzyToffee

Player Valuation: £500k
Davies probably covered more ground than any other Everton player against Utd.
The two players you mentioned were the who who in the first half in particular were struggling in the game, I think it was more down to their own frustration than anything Tom Davies didn't do .
He never stopped showing for the ball,in fact he never does.
never been on his back and thought he had a good game really do, but watched the game twice now and it was just a few times when we had the ball and he was close by he could have been a bit more reactive and just made room for an out pass. Only an observation I didn't pickit up the first watch but looked for it when the 2 mentioned had a go at him.
 

Foxache

Player Valuation: £500k

Forgotten Tom Davies showing his potential under Carlo Ancelotti’s watch at Everton​

The midfielder, still only 22, is finding he has a role to play

Paul Joyce, Northern Football Correspondent | Monday February 08 2021, 5.00pm, The Times

There were still a couple of weeks left in the summer transfer window when Carlo Ancelotti gave it to Tom Davies straight.

Ralph Hasenhüttl’s Southampton were keen to take the Everton midfielder on loan, or indeed permanently, and there was interest from Sheffield United, Newcastle United and Bournemouth.

During a chat in Ancelotti’s office at Finch Farm, the Italian made it clear to Davies that he would not be leaving and outlined a plan to kick-start the development of the 22-year-old.

It would require patience on the part of Davies but there would be regular input from the manager and the chance to learn from the likes of James Rodríguez, Allan and others in training.

Fast-forward to the present and the rewards of that approach are starting to become evident.

The green shoots of Davies’s revival were clear during Everton’s 3-3 draw against Manchester United on Saturday, when he was deployed as the deepest-lying of three midfielders.

There was a pass completion rate of 90.3 per cent, a 57.1 per cent success rate in duels, a 100 per cent success rate in his tackles. If he lost the ball (three times) he worked to recover it every time.

methode-times-prod-web-bin-c1fa51d8-69fe-11eb-bc24-b1bb9cd3bc5f.jpg

Davies put in a superb showing in the 3-3 draw with United on Saturday


Davies also had a forward pass completion rate of 81.8 per cent, best showcased when he was involved in the move that helped Everton to launch their initial fightback from 2-0 down at Old Trafford.

It had been similar in the recent 1-1 draw with Leicester City, when the England Under-21 international had last started. Then his duel success was slightly higher, at 62.5 per cent, and his pass completion 88.5 per cent.

Crucially, it was Davies’s pass that played through the press of Leicester’s Wilfred Ndidi and released André Gomes, who set up a spectacular goal by Rodríguez.
That Davies did well against two sides above Everton in the Premier League vindicated Ancelotti’s willingness to trust him.

Hopefully, it will bolster his confidence given the testing times that he has endured since he announced himself to a wider audience with that wonderful goal in a 4-0 rout of Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City in January 2017.
A solo effort in which he bamboozle Gaël Clichy and Yaya Touré, before a dinked finish beyond Claudio Bravo, set the bar incredibly high — too high — for the teenager. The comedown has, on occasions, been harsh, with the instability that followed at Everton exacerbating matters.

Davies has already had seven managers in his 138-game career, having impressed Roberto Martínez sufficiently to make his debut in April 2016 before Ronald Koeman came in, followed by David Unsworth (caretaker), Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva, Duncan Ferguson (caretaker) and now Ancelotti.

There will have been times over the past four years where he could perhaps have done more but equally, for some players, that backdrop of constant change would not be conducive to learning.

Davies has been used in different midfield positions and even as a right-wing back by Ancelotti this term in ever-changing teams and that is another factor that has to be considered when scrutinising his fortunes.
He will not have been oblivious to how he is perceived by some, but he has shown resilience to persevere. Rather than his interests outside of football — fashion, photography, art, skateboarding — somehow getting in the way of his career, they have likely served as a release during those difficult periods.

There is still plenty for him to do and his recent performances must become a launchpad. In any case, though, Ancelotti’s willingness to invest time in the player highlights an aspect of his work that is often overlooked.
We see the signings he has been able to attract and he will doubtless have more in mind in the future, but he has eked more from Dominic Calvert-Lewin and the signs are that Davies can also lend his weight to the cause.
The financial situation at Everton — losses of £139.9 million were outlined in the recent general meeting — means that it is imperative that the club’s academy produces talents that can push for first-team football or be sold for decent fees. The reliance on the deep pockets of the owner, Farhad Moshiri, is not healthy.

There will still be bumps in the road ahead for Davies. The impending return of Allan after a hamstring injury represents another challenge, but where many thought Davies should be consigned to the past he is indicating that he has a place in the present.
 

Toast

Player Valuation: £70m

Forgotten Tom Davies showing his potential under Carlo Ancelotti’s watch at Everton​

The midfielder, still only 22, is finding he has a role to play

Paul Joyce, Northern Football Correspondent | Monday February 08 2021, 5.00pm, The Times

There were still a couple of weeks left in the summer transfer window when Carlo Ancelotti gave it to Tom Davies straight.

Ralph Hasenhüttl’s Southampton were keen to take the Everton midfielder on loan, or indeed permanently, and there was interest from Sheffield United, Newcastle United and Bournemouth.

During a chat in Ancelotti’s office at Finch Farm, the Italian made it clear to Davies that he would not be leaving and outlined a plan to kick-start the development of the 22-year-old.

It would require patience on the part of Davies but there would be regular input from the manager and the chance to learn from the likes of James Rodríguez, Allan and others in training.

Fast-forward to the present and the rewards of that approach are starting to become evident.

The green shoots of Davies’s revival were clear during Everton’s 3-3 draw against Manchester United on Saturday, when he was deployed as the deepest-lying of three midfielders.

There was a pass completion rate of 90.3 per cent, a 57.1 per cent success rate in duels, a 100 per cent success rate in his tackles. If he lost the ball (three times) he worked to recover it every time.

methode-times-prod-web-bin-c1fa51d8-69fe-11eb-bc24-b1bb9cd3bc5f.jpg

Davies put in a superb showing in the 3-3 draw with United on Saturday


Davies also had a forward pass completion rate of 81.8 per cent, best showcased when he was involved in the move that helped Everton to launch their initial fightback from 2-0 down at Old Trafford.

It had been similar in the recent 1-1 draw with Leicester City, when the England Under-21 international had last started. Then his duel success was slightly higher, at 62.5 per cent, and his pass completion 88.5 per cent.

Crucially, it was Davies’s pass that played through the press of Leicester’s Wilfred Ndidi and released André Gomes, who set up a spectacular goal by Rodríguez.
That Davies did well against two sides above Everton in the Premier League vindicated Ancelotti’s willingness to trust him.

Hopefully, it will bolster his confidence given the testing times that he has endured since he announced himself to a wider audience with that wonderful goal in a 4-0 rout of Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City in January 2017.
A solo effort in which he bamboozle Gaël Clichy and Yaya Touré, before a dinked finish beyond Claudio Bravo, set the bar incredibly high — too high — for the teenager. The comedown has, on occasions, been harsh, with the instability that followed at Everton exacerbating matters.

Davies has already had seven managers in his 138-game career, having impressed Roberto Martínez sufficiently to make his debut in April 2016 before Ronald Koeman came in, followed by David Unsworth (caretaker), Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva, Duncan Ferguson (caretaker) and now Ancelotti.

There will have been times over the past four years where he could perhaps have done more but equally, for some players, that backdrop of constant change would not be conducive to learning.

Davies has been used in different midfield positions and even as a right-wing back by Ancelotti this term in ever-changing teams and that is another factor that has to be considered when scrutinising his fortunes.
He will not have been oblivious to how he is perceived by some, but he has shown resilience to persevere. Rather than his interests outside of football — fashion, photography, art, skateboarding — somehow getting in the way of his career, they have likely served as a release during those difficult periods.

There is still plenty for him to do and his recent performances must become a launchpad. In any case, though, Ancelotti’s willingness to invest time in the player highlights an aspect of his work that is often overlooked.
We see the signings he has been able to attract and he will doubtless have more in mind in the future, but he has eked more from Dominic Calvert-Lewin and the signs are that Davies can also lend his weight to the cause.
The financial situation at Everton — losses of £139.9 million were outlined in the recent general meeting — means that it is imperative that the club’s academy produces talents that can push for first-team football or be sold for decent fees. The reliance on the deep pockets of the owner, Farhad Moshiri, is not healthy.

There will still be bumps in the road ahead for Davies. The impending return of Allan after a hamstring injury represents another challenge, but where many thought Davies should be consigned to the past he is indicating that he has a place in the present.
He’s 22 and had 7 Everton managers.

Mind boggling.
 

Vaughan

Player Valuation: £2.5m
Having a defined role, confidence and runners around him and he's much imporved.

Gonna play a key part in the run in

Would be interesting to see him at the base of the midfield with Doucoure and Allan given more license to attack
 

gaino92

Power level over 9000
Good squad player, he does the hard part and then too often messes up the easy part, if he eradicates that from his game he'll be a mainstay in this squad going forward
 

TheBigIguana

Player Valuation: £70m
Good squad player, he does the hard part and then too often messes up the easy part, if he eradicates that from his game he'll be a mainstay in this squad going forward
Thing is he's one of few players in our midfield who will ever do the hard part and sometimes you gotta take that risk. Maybe his balance is off and he should do it less but again someone has to so as a team we have to figure it out.
 

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