2018/19 Marco Silva - New Poll Added

Grade Marco Silva's 2018/19 Season

  • A

  • B

  • C

  • D

  • E

  • F


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hktoffee

Player Valuation: £70m
That's not really how things work though, we could go and sign a top manager like you want and they could sign a load of duffers and do nothing next season. You have no idea what the other teams are going to do or who they will sign. Why spend that money on payouts for another manager, it would be utter madness. Silva might not be everyones choice but we have to stick with it for the moment for a number of reasons. Let's be honest we have never seen him setup a proper team because we don't have striker to put in the team nor do we have the players to play his prefered 4-3-3 tactic.
I think sticking with him for now whilst not ideal is the only way. I think the longer term aim is this: need to build a spine from back to front, then make that spine into a first eleven, then that first eleven into a squad. That is going to take a few windows and seasons, when we have done that only then will we be ready to start thinking about top 6 and cup runs and all that. I think the idea is if we can sort that stuff over a few years then by the time the stadium is on course and we move in we will have a squad ready to compete in a new stadium.
Shorter term, i think we are looking to reduce a very large squad that has been enabled to grow to an excessive size and with many on healthy wage packets despite being very average players, these guys are stopping us from bringing in the younger more talented players we do want because of FFP.
I think the basic thing is to get the team defending properly. I don’t see that and am struggling to find reasons that he has the attributes to lead the team to complete with top 6.

Some fans said it’s hard to judge a manager in one season but I am not impressed by his stats in PL so far. He can only win 3 games in 10.
 

Charles Hawtrey

Player Valuation: £25m
So for comparison, Pickford has had a pretty inconsistent 2018 so far..... would you bin him off now to Bayern (if the rules allowed), let Steklenburg see out the season as interim goalkeeper and then hope for someone to come along in the summer who is better than Pickford.... hmmmm....
Or perhaps more topically would you let go of your top goalscorer, Lukaku, without a plan to replace him - that would be foolish.
And yet we continually talk of 'sacking' silva, as if that in itself would make us a successful club. We should be looking for Silva's replacement almost from day one - thinking about the next Everton manager proactively not re-actively after poor results....
 

MarcelsGoat

Player Valuation: £90m
Is there even a case for Everton keeping Marco Silva now? The jury's out

Marco Silva Everton

In the bottom half, one win in six and no sign of improvement on the horizon. Just how patient is Farhad Moshiri?


“In this business, you have to hold your nerve.”

One of the most influential men on Merseyside football was talking. It wasn’t a reference to so-called bottlers or the stress that Liverpool’s title challenge confers. It was Farhad Moshiri, speaking last month. Or, to put it another way, a month after he said Everton’s league position was “just not good enough”. They were 11th then. They are 11th now.

There are different types of pressure. Everton’s comes from mid-table underachievement. They have four remaining home games, three of which are against the top six. They have four wins in 17 league matches; in that time, 17 teams have more and only the doomed duo of Fulham and Huddersfield have fewer.

Moshiri sacked Ronald Koeman after a run of one win in eight top-flight outings, and when his team had finished seventh five months earlier. His nerve is now being tested by Marco Silva.

Everton don’t want a reputation as the club who went from School of Science to School of Panic. They hoped their days as knee-jerk reactionaries ended when the increasingly reactionary Sam Allardyce was sacked.

“Marco Silva is a talented coach but he's planning long-term,” Moshiri stated recently.

Silva ticked boxes: young, ambitious, with an attacking style of football. He was a coach Everton wanted so much that they sacrificed last season with Allardyce’s caretaker reign, and paid Watford £4 million in compensation.

Everton need continuity, not a hire-and-fire culture; a squad forged and finessed over several years of careful planning, not an expensive hotchpotch of a group cobbled together by different managers and powerbrokers.

Yet the circumstances feel damning. Saturday felt very much like the end of Roberto Martinez’s reign, of the way his Everton snatched defeat from the jaws of victory against West Ham in 2016. Once again, a 2-0 lead was transformed into a 3-2 loss. Everton’s summer decision threatens to be more awkward and more agonising.

What now?

Because the worst-case scenario is that Everton limp on before, amid more crowd unrest, they have another October sacking and another wasted year. And so an assessment beckons.

It’s undeniable that Silva has made Everton more entertaining, more attack-minded and more prolific. There is a comparatively recent example of an undistinguished first year on Merseyside giving way to an infinitely superior second: Brendan Rodgers at Liverpool. There is the example that Estoril progressed in Silva’s second and third campaigns, even if it has to be set against the fact that he hasn’t lasted into a sophomore season anywhere else; the long-term plans are in the hands of a short-term specialist.

There would be reputational and financial damage from sacking Silva, with another pay-off and another manager wanting to sign his own players.



image: https://images.cdn.fourfourtwo.com/sites/fourfourtwo.com/files/styles/inline-image/public/marco_silva_richarlison.jpg?itok=t7kWMh53




But there’s a cost even to keep the current squad, given that Andre Gomes and Kurt Zouma are only on loan and their purchase prices could amount to £50 million. It feels harder to justify when perhaps only Richarlison of Silva’s signings qualifies as a success; even then, though very gifted, he is an expensive, inconsistent and has just two goals against top-half opponents since the opening day.

Bernard and Gomes have flattered to deceive, Lucas Digne has fared better going forward than in his own half, and the reality that Zouma has outperformed the £28 million Yerry Mina is worrying in itself.

Soft centre

That remodelled rearguard has been breached far too often; that Everton have conceded the most set-piece goals in the division speaks to a failure of their zonal-marking system; that Gomes leaves the back four unprotected and Idrissa Gueye overworked is a recurring problem.

Everton kept successive clean sheets when the stylish Portuguese was benched. He was recalled at Newcastle and they conceded three. Style has been prioritised over substance and solidity.

Tom Davies has been sidelined in the process. Silva has made noises about trusting young players, and such faith does tend to offer reason for reciprocation in a coach. But Davies figured more for Allardyce, Mason Holgate has been dispatched on loan to West Brom, Ademola Lookman has only been granted three Premier League starts and Dominic Calvert-Lewin feels underused for a player averaging a goal every 194 minutes (and the older Cenk Tosun overused for one every 467).

Tosun’s underwhelming return is a theme. Theo Walcott has used his speed to regress rapidly. Jordan Pickford has had a troubled time after a stellar year. Seamus Coleman has fought admirably for fitness, but has rarely reached the levels he touched before injury. Gueye hasn’t recaptured the form he displayed in his first season at Goodison Park.

It would be wrong to blame Silva for all of that but, coupled with Mina and Digne’s defensive difficulties and Bernard and Gomes’s lack of productivity, there’s scarcely a pattern of improvement an admired coach would want just as Everton, eighth last season, are in the bottom half now.

Silva can point to players who have delivered more this season than last: Michael Keane, though not back to the standard he showed under Sean Dyche; Gylfi Sigurdsson, producing more goals after being installed in his best position, even if his performances were arguably consistently better under Swansea’s unholy trinity of Francesco Guidolin, Bob Bradley and Paul Clement; Richarlison, who didn’t score for Watford after his mentor’s dismissal.

Future promise?



Yet Everton offer the sense of untapped potential and of expenditure not being reflected in results. That doesn’t help a manager’s cause; it offers the question if someone else could extract more, much as Javi Gracia has done at Vicarage Road.


Silva’s past can be held against him, and not merely by Hornets fans. His spells at Hull, Watford and Everton have had common denominators, of fine starts followed by relapses in results, albeit in wildly different circumstances.

So the evidence may be unflattering. Managers can be sustained by a promise of progress in transitional seasons and Silva has to offer a brighter future when, by the owner’s own admission, the present is unsatisfactory.

There is no doubt that, unlike with Allardyce, Everton’s preference is to stick with him. But if the truism is that managers need time, Moshiri has been reluctant to give it to those he has deemed the wrong choices. And while Silva could be championed or condemned, there are reasons to argue either case. It’s not just about Moshiri’s nerve, but his judgement.

Read more at https://www.fourfourtwo.com/features/there-even-a-case-everton-keeping-marco-silva-now-jurys-out#63rwMXYdo6zP18mO.99


My favourite bit is this :

"Theo Walcott has used his speed to regress rapidly"
 

bicycleheader

Te parto la puta cara!
Then shall we not sack any manager from now on? Say we finish around 11th-15th this season and the same is being served next season would you sack him?

IF we’re not getting a top manager then prepare to embrace mediocrity. It will be a miracle if he can get 7th next season.
Of course. There's a limit. However I personally don't think one season is enough, considering the circumstances he came in to. Our conversation is more about what next.

I don't think it's black and white. Top manager OR mediocrity. The right choice can make this work.

However I think given the type of manager we are likely to employ if or when we do sack Silva, some fans are going to have to learn patience....because we can't freak out everytime a manager starts badly or has one bad season.
 

hktoffee

Player Valuation: £70m
Of course. There's a limit. However I personally don't think one season is enough, considering the circumstances he came in to. Our conversation is more about what next.

I don't think it's black and white. Top manager OR mediocrity. The right choice can make this work.

However I think given the type of manager we are likely to employ if or when we do sack Silva, some fans are going to have to learn patience....because we can't freak out everytime a manager starts badly or has one bad season.
I understand your concern about paying the compensation to former managers.

I just don’t know how many fans can endure the continuity of bad results unless somehow everything dramatically change next season.
 

BigBlueNose

Player Valuation: £70m
Is there even a case for Everton keeping Marco Silva now? The jury's out

Marco Silva Everton

In the bottom half, one win in six and no sign of improvement on the horizon. Just how patient is Farhad Moshiri?


“In this business, you have to hold your nerve.”

One of the most influential men on Merseyside football was talking. It wasn’t a reference to so-called bottlers or the stress that Liverpool’s title challenge confers. It was Farhad Moshiri, speaking last month. Or, to put it another way, a month after he said Everton’s league position was “just not good enough”. They were 11th then. They are 11th now.

There are different types of pressure. Everton’s comes from mid-table underachievement. They have four remaining home games, three of which are against the top six. They have four wins in 17 league matches; in that time, 17 teams have more and only the doomed duo of Fulham and Huddersfield have fewer.

Moshiri sacked Ronald Koeman after a run of one win in eight top-flight outings, and when his team had finished seventh five months earlier. His nerve is now being tested by Marco Silva.

Everton don’t want a reputation as the club who went from School of Science to School of Panic. They hoped their days as knee-jerk reactionaries ended when the increasingly reactionary Sam Allardyce was sacked.

“Marco Silva is a talented coach but he's planning long-term,” Moshiri stated recently.

Silva ticked boxes: young, ambitious, with an attacking style of football. He was a coach Everton wanted so much that they sacrificed last season with Allardyce’s caretaker reign, and paid Watford £4 million in compensation.

Everton need continuity, not a hire-and-fire culture; a squad forged and finessed over several years of careful planning, not an expensive hotchpotch of a group cobbled together by different managers and powerbrokers.

Yet the circumstances feel damning. Saturday felt very much like the end of Roberto Martinez’s reign, of the way his Everton snatched defeat from the jaws of victory against West Ham in 2016. Once again, a 2-0 lead was transformed into a 3-2 loss. Everton’s summer decision threatens to be more awkward and more agonising.

What now?

Because the worst-case scenario is that Everton limp on before, amid more crowd unrest, they have another October sacking and another wasted year. And so an assessment beckons.

It’s undeniable that Silva has made Everton more entertaining, more attack-minded and more prolific. There is a comparatively recent example of an undistinguished first year on Merseyside giving way to an infinitely superior second: Brendan Rodgers at Liverpool. There is the example that Estoril progressed in Silva’s second and third campaigns, even if it has to be set against the fact that he hasn’t lasted into a sophomore season anywhere else; the long-term plans are in the hands of a short-term specialist.

There would be reputational and financial damage from sacking Silva, with another pay-off and another manager wanting to sign his own players.



image: https://images.cdn.fourfourtwo.com/sites/fourfourtwo.com/files/styles/inline-image/public/marco_silva_richarlison.jpg?itok=t7kWMh53




But there’s a cost even to keep the current squad, given that Andre Gomes and Kurt Zouma are only on loan and their purchase prices could amount to £50 million. It feels harder to justify when perhaps only Richarlison of Silva’s signings qualifies as a success; even then, though very gifted, he is an expensive, inconsistent and has just two goals against top-half opponents since the opening day.

Bernard and Gomes have flattered to deceive, Lucas Digne has fared better going forward than in his own half, and the reality that Zouma has outperformed the £28 million Yerry Mina is worrying in itself.

Soft centre

That remodelled rearguard has been breached far too often; that Everton have conceded the most set-piece goals in the division speaks to a failure of their zonal-marking system; that Gomes leaves the back four unprotected and Idrissa Gueye overworked is a recurring problem.

Everton kept successive clean sheets when the stylish Portuguese was benched. He was recalled at Newcastle and they conceded three. Style has been prioritised over substance and solidity.

Tom Davies has been sidelined in the process. Silva has made noises about trusting young players, and such faith does tend to offer reason for reciprocation in a coach. But Davies figured more for Allardyce, Mason Holgate has been dispatched on loan to West Brom, Ademola Lookman has only been granted three Premier League starts and Dominic Calvert-Lewin feels underused for a player averaging a goal every 194 minutes (and the older Cenk Tosun overused for one every 467).

Tosun’s underwhelming return is a theme. Theo Walcott has used his speed to regress rapidly. Jordan Pickford has had a troubled time after a stellar year. Seamus Coleman has fought admirably for fitness, but has rarely reached the levels he touched before injury. Gueye hasn’t recaptured the form he displayed in his first season at Goodison Park.

It would be wrong to blame Silva for all of that but, coupled with Mina and Digne’s defensive difficulties and Bernard and Gomes’s lack of productivity, there’s scarcely a pattern of improvement an admired coach would want just as Everton, eighth last season, are in the bottom half now.

Silva can point to players who have delivered more this season than last: Michael Keane, though not back to the standard he showed under Sean Dyche; Gylfi Sigurdsson, producing more goals after being installed in his best position, even if his performances were arguably consistently better under Swansea’s unholy trinity of Francesco Guidolin, Bob Bradley and Paul Clement; Richarlison, who didn’t score for Watford after his mentor’s dismissal.

Future promise?



Yet Everton offer the sense of untapped potential and of expenditure not being reflected in results. That doesn’t help a manager’s cause; it offers the question if someone else could extract more, much as Javi Gracia has done at Vicarage Road.


Silva’s past can be held against him, and not merely by Hornets fans. His spells at Hull, Watford and Everton have had common denominators, of fine starts followed by relapses in results, albeit in wildly different circumstances.

So the evidence may be unflattering. Managers can be sustained by a promise of progress in transitional seasons and Silva has to offer a brighter future when, by the owner’s own admission, the present is unsatisfactory.

There is no doubt that, unlike with Allardyce, Everton’s preference is to stick with him. But if the truism is that managers need time, Moshiri has been reluctant to give it to those he has deemed the wrong choices. And while Silva could be championed or condemned, there are reasons to argue either case. It’s not just about Moshiri’s nerve, but his judgement.

Read more at https://www.fourfourtwo.com/features/there-even-a-case-everton-keeping-marco-silva-now-jurys-out#63rwMXYdo6zP18mO.99


My favourite bit is this :

"Theo Walcott has used his speed to regress rapidly"
I agree with you there mate
 

COYBL25

Official GOT Joey Speak Interpreter.
It's an interesting conversation. I really think that even if we give Silva the boot, that the next guy will also need patience but wonder would they get it.

This and how the hell they are going to manage the conundrum that is the next transfer window.
Even if we did appoint someone like Conte, thered be the usual few on here calling for his head if we werent in the top six by Christmas.

Some of them still yearn for Allardyce, which says all you need to know about them lol
 

ToffeeTim

Player Valuation: £70m
Of course. There's a limit. However I personally don't think one season is enough, considering the circumstances he came in to. Our conversation is more about what next.

I don't think it's black and white. Top manager OR mediocrity. The right choice can make this work.

However I think given the type of manager we are likely to employ if or when we do sack Silva, some fans are going to have to learn patience....because we can't freak out everytime a manager starts badly or has one bad season.
I feel people have been very patient with Silva. Our form since December has been as bad as we've had since Moyes. As bad as Koeman's bad run was, only over twice as long a period. It's not acceptable in any season under whatever circumstances. I've no idea whether we should keep Silva or not. He's done a very poor job and he's getting worse over time. If he gets next season then he must perform immediately. We can't afford to be in a position where we need to sack him in October. It's a messy situation with no obvious answer. Stick or twist... I've no idea.
 

Axlswhk

Player Valuation: £35m
It's an interesting conversation. I really think that even if we give Silva the boot, that the next guy will also need patience but wonder would they get it.

This and how the hell they are going to manage the conundrum that is the next transfer window.
Sometime, a healthy string of clean sheet and healthy amount of goals will earn lots of patience in the Long run. We don’t need one more season to find out, if this continue till October we still have time to act and save our season, but it will be hard to find anyone decent in October. If there is serious doubt, best time to act is end of May.
 
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