Everton Bygones

summerisle

The rain, it raineth every day
Any snippets of old Everton history please post here. Here's an Echo article from 1889 giving information on our first season in 1888, as well as vignettes of the first League team. Acidly written compared nowadays to the anodyne rubbish passed off as comment.

https://playupliverpool.com/1889/11/16/the-everton-heroes/

Saturday, November 16 – 1889
During the past few years, the Association football has made giant strides, in Liverpool and district, as witness the existence and prosperity of such teams as those disporting themselves before thousands of spectators, week by week, at Everton and Bootle; also somewhat minor clubs of good standing, as the Stanley, Bootle Athletic, and a dozen teams, all capable of giving a fairly scientific exposition of the game.

Ten years ago, a good game of Association football was not to be seen in the neighbourhood, the field being almost entirely held by the Rugby Union men. But each year the circular ball had continued to assert a rivalry with the oval, till now the two clubs first named are the means of drawing more spectators than all the Rugby matches put together. And their comparative standing, too, is far ahead of the local Rugby clubs; for New Brighton, Birkenhead Park, Liverpool, or the Old Boys all occupy much lower positions in the world of Rugby football than do the Everton in the Association community.

The Everton men can give the best teams in the three countries a good game; while the local Rugby fifteens make but a sorry show against such a team as the Fetter Loretto men, West of Scotland, Bradford, and the local champions hailing from balmy Runcorn. Then, in the matter of gates, Everton stands at the top of the list, there being very few clubs in the British Isles showing a weekly average equal to the register of their takings.

Yet it is only nine years since the club was formed, their first ground being a public one, in Stanley Park, where of course, the great desideration of every Association club –“gates” to wit – could not be obtained. For several years the club’s existence was not conspicuous for any remarkable feats, all the players being local and purely amateur ones, both of which qualifications have now been done away with.

Of which more anon. After four years’ play, the public interested in such matters aroused to the fact that Everton might be made famous for other things than toffee, and the supremacy of that toothsome dainty as the particular and peculiar characteristic of the place was at the last threatened, The “King of Everton” – who as all the world knows, is Mr. John Houlding –consulted with his liege subjects, and the result was the acquisition of a piece of land near Stanley Park, Mr. Houlding generously financing the transaction.

With the modesty of greatness, the committee at first erected a couple of small stands for the accommodation of spectators, and until the end of 1887 these sufficed. At the beginning of last season, however, it was found absolutely necessary to increase the accommodation, which was done, at the an expenditure of £1,500 with the result that Everton ground is now as comfortable and as well fitted as any in the kingdom. At each side are large covered stands, behind each goal are other stands, holding nearly 4,000 each, and taking all the stands together, about 12,000 people have a good view of the game from them; while another 6,000 have the same from standing room on the ground. Notwithstanding this, the spectators at times are almost inconveniently crowded, and gates of nearly 20,000 are not altogether unknown. The total receipts last year were £4,500; but of the sum at least £45 was expended every week for paying the professional players.

There were, however, circumstances, which will hardly occur again, necessitating this large outlay. Several professionals who were engaged at the beginning of the season did not realise the expectations formed of them, and others had to be looked for, so that the committee were compelled to pay for men whom they did not require. Owing to their lengthily gold-bags, the Everton Club can offer to good professionals exceptionally favourable terms, and of course the Land of cakes, being the home of the Association game, has had to part with several fine players, who show an inclination of going “back again.”

Among them are a couple of Scottish Internationals – Andrew Hannah, the captain, and Alex Latta. Although Liverpudlians and especially Evertonian folk, are proud of their club, it is to be regretted that there is not a single home-grown player in the team, as this is surely a sad indication that the district cannot raise a man of really first-class form.

It will doubtless be of interest to-day if we give a brief sketch of the football career run by the Everton team. Individually as it was constituted a few weeks ago; but doubtless one or two alterations have been made, James Weir for instance, not turning out of late, owing to injuries received.

Beginning at the goal we take Robert Smalley who frequently known as Bob Smalley. Bob is a professional of the game, who’s place on the field is under the cross-bar, where he has achieved no little fame. He is 5ft 8in, in height, and his kicking weight is 10st 10lbs. Robert is a Lancashire lad, and first saw the light in 1866 in the town of Darwen, after which the family removed to Preston. There Bob joined the North End, and for the reserve team he made his appearance as left wing forward. During a match he was roughly handled and subsequently to this he was allocated the post of goalkeeper, and in that defensive position, he has remained, repelling hot shots, fisting out shots. He has played for the Everton now for two years.

Then come the two full backs, of whom Andrew Hannah (Captain). Andrew is his front name, and Scotland is his nation, for he was born in Renton, Dunbartonshire on September 17, 1864. He stands 5fy 7ins, with his coat off, and kicks the beam – not to mention the ball –at 11 and half stone. When sixteen years of age, Andy betook himself to jumping, an exercise in which he speedily attained and rivalling of springheel Jack. He attended all the games, as athletic sports are termed across the border and won many prizes, both in running and jumping contests, and truly he made a good thing out of his speed and spring.

The Renton Wanderers soon enrolled him in their ranks, and as full back he played with both sill and in judgement. Soon after the Renton club took him, and Hannah becoming a member rapidly worked himself into the front rank of footballists. He was chosen to represent his county against Glasgow, and later on he played full back against Lancashire, and he afterwards represented his country against Wales in 1887, and last season his services were wanted by the Everton Club, with the result that at the beginning of the present season he was installed as captain. Hannah is not only a fine player, but he makes a good captain.

The other back is, Dan Doyle , the biggest man in the team, standing an inch and a half under six feet, and weighting 13 and half stone. Danny is not such a broth of a boy as his name might imply, for it was in Paisley he was born, over twenty-three years ago. Doyle’s weights has served him in good stead during the eight years he has figured on the fields of various clubs, his first love being the Airdrie Club, which he added for four years than playing a season with Broxburn, and afterwards with the Edinburgh Hibernians.

In 1888, at the beginning of the season he went to Grimsby, leaving that club for the Bolton Wanderers before the season closed. With the Wanderers he did great things being on the ball when they beat the proud Preston by 5 goals to one. In May of this year Doyle broke the proverb by going back to Scotland, but he once more said farewell to Auld Reakie and the Gralasmarket, and joined himself unto the Everton club. Both as a defensive and an aggressive player Doyle is a valuable man, and plays with equal football on either side.

The right half-back at present, is Charles Parry , who has seen but nineteen summers, or perhaps in the case of a football player we should say winters. At any rate, he is nineteen years of age, 5ft 8 in, in height, and weights 12st, 2lb when in good conditions. He is a robustly built young fellow, and has been extremely useful to the team, first as a forward, and more recently – since Weir was hurt at Wolverhampton – at half-back.

Parry’s first exploits in the football field were on behalf of a small football club in Oswestry, subsequently casting in his lot with the Chester St. Oswald’s with whom he played as centre forward till last season was well on the wane, when he joined Everton.

The left back is George Farmer, who was born in Oswestry twenty-six years ago, weights 11st , and stands barely 5ft 6in. Geordie is a great favourite with the Everton people, before whom he has been for a long time, being almost a Liverpudlian by right of his seven years’ residence here. Taking into account the tender age of the game he may be fairly called a genuine Liverpool player.

The gentleman who does the sketches for the Football Echo has rather failed to catch Geordie’s charming smile, but for this he has nobly attempted to compensate by giving a fine moustache. Farmer and his smile appeared first to support the fortunes of the Oswestry eleven, and by his qualification there be thrice donned jersey for Wales, look you, as left wing forward. He has played several times for Lancashire, and no district team of Liverpool is complete without him. As a forward he played a dashing game, being as full of tricks as a Waterbury watch, but he has now settled down at half back, where his defensive tackling finds full scope.

Johnny Holt , the centre half back, who is twenty-one, weights 10st, prompt, and is 5ft 4 and half inches, high so that he is not a large man. John Holt began his football career at the age of fifteen, with the Kings’ Own F.C., but he ultimately joined the Church Club, and there were soon marked as a fine player. Four years since he came to Liverpool, playing with the Bootle Club for two years, but last season he came to Everton, being a very great acquisition to the club. Holt is without doubt one of the best half-backs in England, his tackling capabilities being what the old Dominie, termed “Prodigious!” Last Year he played for Lancashire against East of Scotland, the country winning by seven goals to one. Last year he narrowly escaped becoming an international, being chosen as a reserve against Scotland.

Probably one of the greatest favourites with the Everton crowds is Fred Geary who is but a slender youth, weighting 9 stone, and being 5ft 7ins, above the level of the sea, so to speak, as it were, or words to that effect. Geary is a Nottinghamtonian – that’s a good word –and first saw the light in the Lace City on January 23, 1867.

A few years after this auspicious date he joined the Bothwell Rangers, playing both well and hard. He continued but one season with the Rangers, and then got on the books of the Basford Rovers, whom, however, he did not serve long, going to the Notts Rangers, with which club he played for three years. Inducements of a pleasant character were instrumental in securing his presence in the ranks of Everton.

He was in Liverpool soon after the close of last season, and during the Athletic term he went in for amateur sprinting, in which field he carried off three firsts, two seconds, and ditto of thirds –not at all a bad record for toeing the mark nine times only. He subsequently ran as a professional, and in August last he won a £20 handicap in a most easy fashion, although he was a rank outsider in the opinion of the knowing “bookies.”

Geary’s great speed, his lightness of foot, and his agility are eminently useful qualities, and it is a sight to him scouring down the field with the ball at his toe, puraned by hopeful but leaden-footed opponents. The estimation in which the speedy forward is held may be gauged to some extent by the result of a competition recently organised by an athletic paper, Geary being voted the best forward in England. Although that is a matter for discussion, there can be no doubt he is one of the best centre forwards in the country.

Alex Latta, outside wing forward, is twenty-two years of age, he weighs 12 stone, and stands 5ft 8in, in his socks. Since 1884 he played for Dumbarton Athletic, of which club he was as original member. He was chosen in his county team eight times, and he further represented Scotland against England in the matches last season, and against Wales the previous season. Latta is a new acquisition so Everton this year, his play being of that well-judged nature which so strengthen any team. He is a really fine all-round player, and his large experience against first-class clubs is of much use to him. He has won about a dozen medals in football contests, the majority being gold trophies.

Alex Brady . Is another son of Caledonia. He is nineteen years of age, 5ft 5 and half in, high, and weighs 10 stone. He is fairly fast, very tricky, and has a wonderful control over the ball, which he can twist. Curl, and break in a manner the most surprising. His forward play is very good, his training being the Renton star and Renton Thistle Clubs. Last year he went to Sunderland in which club he played as an amateur, and subsequently he figured with the Burnley team. Later he returned to Glasgow, but was given a call by the Everton Club, with whom he hopes to remain.

Edgar Chadwick is a Blackburn lad of twenty years, weights 10st, sharp and his front elevation is 5 and half feet. His first experience of the game with a club called the “ Little Dots,” which qualified him for a place in the Blackburn Olympic Reserves. His play in the team was so good that room in the first eleven was made, and Chadwick soon justified the action of the committee so that the Blackburn Rovers annexed him for a season, and last year he joined Everton. Edgar is a fine all round footballists, being a good shot, an excellent kick in any position, leaving one foot free, and his capabilities are available as half-back, or forward-a most useful man for the best team.

James Weir was a fine half-back for the club, but he got hurt some weeks ago. Although he is not yet playing again.

Bob Cain , who played with the Airdrie Club till lately, has now joined the Everton, and plays at half, vice Farmer, who has not altogether please the committee of late.

Alf Milward, who plays for the first team this season, is a capital forward, although one of the youngest members of the team. He formerly played in the London district, where he earned for himself a reputation, which his play here has already enhanced.
(Liverpool Echo, 16-11-1889)


Lots of other articles here.

https://playupliverpool.com/?s=Everton
 

captainvindaloo

Player Valuation: £10m
an expenditure of £1,500 with the result that Everton ground is now as comfortable and as well fitted as any in the kingdom
he total receipts last year were £4,500; but of the sum at least £45 was expended every week for paying the professional players.
Those were the days, gate receipts greatly out numbering both the salaries of the players AND the cost of the stadium put together!!!
Today, a stadium would cost about £300M to £500M. That means the equivalent gate receipts would have to amount to roughly £1Billion!!
 

gonetomorrow

Player Valuation: £70m
How interesting. I like the strong Scots connections.

They're all quite small in stature aren't they? The tallest is "big" Dan Doyle at 5'10 and half and the goalie's only 5'8.

It must have been the poor diet in those days. It's still bad in many parts.
 

kev

Player Valuation: £40m
Any snippets of old Everton history please post here. Here's an Echo article from 1889 giving information on our first season in 1888, as well as vignettes of the first League team. Acidly written compared nowadays to the anodyne rubbish passed off as comment.

https://playupliverpool.com/1889/11/16/the-everton-heroes/

Saturday, November 16 – 1889
During the past few years, the Association football has made giant strides, in Liverpool and district, as witness the existence and prosperity of such teams as those disporting themselves before thousands of spectators, week by week, at Everton and Bootle; also somewhat minor clubs of good standing, as the Stanley, Bootle Athletic, and a dozen teams, all capable of giving a fairly scientific exposition of the game.

Ten years ago, a good game of Association football was not to be seen in the neighbourhood, the field being almost entirely held by the Rugby Union men. But each year the circular ball had continued to assert a rivalry with the oval, till now the two clubs first named are the means of drawing more spectators than all the Rugby matches put together. And their comparative standing, too, is far ahead of the local Rugby clubs; for New Brighton, Birkenhead Park, Liverpool, or the Old Boys all occupy much lower positions in the world of Rugby football than do the Everton in the Association community.

The Everton men can give the best teams in the three countries a good game; while the local Rugby fifteens make but a sorry show against such a team as the Fetter Loretto men, West of Scotland, Bradford, and the local champions hailing from balmy Runcorn. Then, in the matter of gates, Everton stands at the top of the list, there being very few clubs in the British Isles showing a weekly average equal to the register of their takings.

Yet it is only nine years since the club was formed, their first ground being a public one, in Stanley Park, where of course, the great desideration of every Association club –“gates” to wit – could not be obtained. For several years the club’s existence was not conspicuous for any remarkable feats, all the players being local and purely amateur ones, both of which qualifications have now been done away with.

Of which more anon. After four years’ play, the public interested in such matters aroused to the fact that Everton might be made famous for other things than toffee, and the supremacy of that toothsome dainty as the particular and peculiar characteristic of the place was at the last threatened, The “King of Everton” – who as all the world knows, is Mr. John Houlding –consulted with his liege subjects, and the result was the acquisition of a piece of land near Stanley Park, Mr. Houlding generously financing the transaction.

With the modesty of greatness, the committee at first erected a couple of small stands for the accommodation of spectators, and until the end of 1887 these sufficed. At the beginning of last season, however, it was found absolutely necessary to increase the accommodation, which was done, at the an expenditure of £1,500 with the result that Everton ground is now as comfortable and as well fitted as any in the kingdom. At each side are large covered stands, behind each goal are other stands, holding nearly 4,000 each, and taking all the stands together, about 12,000 people have a good view of the game from them; while another 6,000 have the same from standing room on the ground. Notwithstanding this, the spectators at times are almost inconveniently crowded, and gates of nearly 20,000 are not altogether unknown. The total receipts last year were £4,500; but of the sum at least £45 was expended every week for paying the professional players.

There were, however, circumstances, which will hardly occur again, necessitating this large outlay. Several professionals who were engaged at the beginning of the season did not realise the expectations formed of them, and others had to be looked for, so that the committee were compelled to pay for men whom they did not require. Owing to their lengthily gold-bags, the Everton Club can offer to good professionals exceptionally favourable terms, and of course the Land of cakes, being the home of the Association game, has had to part with several fine players, who show an inclination of going “back again.”

Among them are a couple of Scottish Internationals – Andrew Hannah, the captain, and Alex Latta. Although Liverpudlians and especially Evertonian folk, are proud of their club, it is to be regretted that there is not a single home-grown player in the team, as this is surely a sad indication that the district cannot raise a man of really first-class form.

It will doubtless be of interest to-day if we give a brief sketch of the football career run by the Everton team. Individually as it was constituted a few weeks ago; but doubtless one or two alterations have been made, James Weir for instance, not turning out of late, owing to injuries received.

Beginning at the goal we take Robert Smalley who frequently known as Bob Smalley. Bob is a professional of the game, who’s place on the field is under the cross-bar, where he has achieved no little fame. He is 5ft 8in, in height, and his kicking weight is 10st 10lbs. Robert is a Lancashire lad, and first saw the light in 1866 in the town of Darwen, after which the family removed to Preston. There Bob joined the North End, and for the reserve team he made his appearance as left wing forward. During a match he was roughly handled and subsequently to this he was allocated the post of goalkeeper, and in that defensive position, he has remained, repelling hot shots, fisting out shots. He has played for the Everton now for two years.

Then come the two full backs, of whom Andrew Hannah (Captain). Andrew is his front name, and Scotland is his nation, for he was born in Renton, Dunbartonshire on September 17, 1864. He stands 5fy 7ins, with his coat off, and kicks the beam – not to mention the ball –at 11 and half stone. When sixteen years of age, Andy betook himself to jumping, an exercise in which he speedily attained and rivalling of springheel Jack. He attended all the games, as athletic sports are termed across the border and won many prizes, both in running and jumping contests, and truly he made a good thing out of his speed and spring.

The Renton Wanderers soon enrolled him in their ranks, and as full back he played with both sill and in judgement. Soon after the Renton club took him, and Hannah becoming a member rapidly worked himself into the front rank of footballists. He was chosen to represent his county against Glasgow, and later on he played full back against Lancashire, and he afterwards represented his country against Wales in 1887, and last season his services were wanted by the Everton Club, with the result that at the beginning of the present season he was installed as captain. Hannah is not only a fine player, but he makes a good captain.

The other back is, Dan Doyle , the biggest man in the team, standing an inch and a half under six feet, and weighting 13 and half stone. Danny is not such a broth of a boy as his name might imply, for it was in Paisley he was born, over twenty-three years ago. Doyle’s weights has served him in good stead during the eight years he has figured on the fields of various clubs, his first love being the Airdrie Club, which he added for four years than playing a season with Broxburn, and afterwards with the Edinburgh Hibernians.

In 1888, at the beginning of the season he went to Grimsby, leaving that club for the Bolton Wanderers before the season closed. With the Wanderers he did great things being on the ball when they beat the proud Preston by 5 goals to one. In May of this year Doyle broke the proverb by going back to Scotland, but he once more said farewell to Auld Reakie and the Gralasmarket, and joined himself unto the Everton club. Both as a defensive and an aggressive player Doyle is a valuable man, and plays with equal football on either side.

The right half-back at present, is Charles Parry , who has seen but nineteen summers, or perhaps in the case of a football player we should say winters. At any rate, he is nineteen years of age, 5ft 8 in, in height, and weights 12st, 2lb when in good conditions. He is a robustly built young fellow, and has been extremely useful to the team, first as a forward, and more recently – since Weir was hurt at Wolverhampton – at half-back.

Parry’s first exploits in the football field were on behalf of a small football club in Oswestry, subsequently casting in his lot with the Chester St. Oswald’s with whom he played as centre forward till last season was well on the wane, when he joined Everton.

The left back is George Farmer, who was born in Oswestry twenty-six years ago, weights 11st , and stands barely 5ft 6in. Geordie is a great favourite with the Everton people, before whom he has been for a long time, being almost a Liverpudlian by right of his seven years’ residence here. Taking into account the tender age of the game he may be fairly called a genuine Liverpool player.

The gentleman who does the sketches for the Football Echo has rather failed to catch Geordie’s charming smile, but for this he has nobly attempted to compensate by giving a fine moustache. Farmer and his smile appeared first to support the fortunes of the Oswestry eleven, and by his qualification there be thrice donned jersey for Wales, look you, as left wing forward. He has played several times for Lancashire, and no district team of Liverpool is complete without him. As a forward he played a dashing game, being as full of tricks as a Waterbury watch, but he has now settled down at half back, where his defensive tackling finds full scope.

Johnny Holt , the centre half back, who is twenty-one, weights 10st, prompt, and is 5ft 4 and half inches, high so that he is not a large man. John Holt began his football career at the age of fifteen, with the Kings’ Own F.C., but he ultimately joined the Church Club, and there were soon marked as a fine player. Four years since he came to Liverpool, playing with the Bootle Club for two years, but last season he came to Everton, being a very great acquisition to the club. Holt is without doubt one of the best half-backs in England, his tackling capabilities being what the old Dominie, termed “Prodigious!” Last Year he played for Lancashire against East of Scotland, the country winning by seven goals to one. Last year he narrowly escaped becoming an international, being chosen as a reserve against Scotland.

Probably one of the greatest favourites with the Everton crowds is Fred Geary who is but a slender youth, weighting 9 stone, and being 5ft 7ins, above the level of the sea, so to speak, as it were, or words to that effect. Geary is a Nottinghamtonian – that’s a good word –and first saw the light in the Lace City on January 23, 1867.

A few years after this auspicious date he joined the Bothwell Rangers, playing both well and hard. He continued but one season with the Rangers, and then got on the books of the Basford Rovers, whom, however, he did not serve long, going to the Notts Rangers, with which club he played for three years. Inducements of a pleasant character were instrumental in securing his presence in the ranks of Everton.

He was in Liverpool soon after the close of last season, and during the Athletic term he went in for amateur sprinting, in which field he carried off three firsts, two seconds, and ditto of thirds –not at all a bad record for toeing the mark nine times only. He subsequently ran as a professional, and in August last he won a £20 handicap in a most easy fashion, although he was a rank outsider in the opinion of the knowing “bookies.”

Geary’s great speed, his lightness of foot, and his agility are eminently useful qualities, and it is a sight to him scouring down the field with the ball at his toe, puraned by hopeful but leaden-footed opponents. The estimation in which the speedy forward is held may be gauged to some extent by the result of a competition recently organised by an athletic paper, Geary being voted the best forward in England. Although that is a matter for discussion, there can be no doubt he is one of the best centre forwards in the country.

Alex Latta, outside wing forward, is twenty-two years of age, he weighs 12 stone, and stands 5ft 8in, in his socks. Since 1884 he played for Dumbarton Athletic, of which club he was as original member. He was chosen in his county team eight times, and he further represented Scotland against England in the matches last season, and against Wales the previous season. Latta is a new acquisition so Everton this year, his play being of that well-judged nature which so strengthen any team. He is a really fine all-round player, and his large experience against first-class clubs is of much use to him. He has won about a dozen medals in football contests, the majority being gold trophies.

Alex Brady . Is another son of Caledonia. He is nineteen years of age, 5ft 5 and half in, high, and weighs 10 stone. He is fairly fast, very tricky, and has a wonderful control over the ball, which he can twist. Curl, and break in a manner the most surprising. His forward play is very good, his training being the Renton star and Renton Thistle Clubs. Last year he went to Sunderland in which club he played as an amateur, and subsequently he figured with the Burnley team. Later he returned to Glasgow, but was given a call by the Everton Club, with whom he hopes to remain.

Edgar Chadwick is a Blackburn lad of twenty years, weights 10st, sharp and his front elevation is 5 and half feet. His first experience of the game with a club called the “ Little Dots,” which qualified him for a place in the Blackburn Olympic Reserves. His play in the team was so good that room in the first eleven was made, and Chadwick soon justified the action of the committee so that the Blackburn Rovers annexed him for a season, and last year he joined Everton. Edgar is a fine all round footballists, being a good shot, an excellent kick in any position, leaving one foot free, and his capabilities are available as half-back, or forward-a most useful man for the best team.

James Weir was a fine half-back for the club, but he got hurt some weeks ago. Although he is not yet playing again.

Bob Cain , who played with the Airdrie Club till lately, has now joined the Everton, and plays at half, vice Farmer, who has not altogether please the committee of late.

Alf Milward, who plays for the first team this season, is a capital forward, although one of the youngest members of the team. He formerly played in the London district, where he earned for himself a reputation, which his play here has already enhanced.
(Liverpool Echo, 16-11-1889)


Lots of other articles here.

https://playupliverpool.com/?s=Everton
Love that.
Who knew that @chicoazul had a grandfather who wrote for the Echo ?
 

degsy

Player Valuation: £70m
Snippets of History eh

Here's a snippet of Alternate History - der der, derr.

Written by Rolant Ellis.

Part I.

Everton beat Panathinaikos in the European Cup Quarter-Final rather than drawing 0 - 0 in 1971. Brian Labone doesn't get injured in the cup semi-final V Liverpool later that week,, and Everton hold on to their 1 - 0 lead to go through to the Cup Final against Arsenal. Everton reach the European Cup Final, although losing to Ajax, and win the F. A. Cup. They then use the extra money (and prestige) gained from these cup runs to make astute purchases such as Archie Gemmill ( in reality Everton almost signed him but he opted for Derby County), and Peter Shilton rather than the hapless Dave Lawson in goal. Harry Catterick steps down after Everton's Cup win in 1971 and is replaced by Brian Clough. This causes Everton to dominate the 1970s, and when Howard Kendall takes over in the early 1980s, he consolidates Everton's position as England's no. 1 club, and a major force in European football. With Liverpool not in the picture, Heysel doesn't happen, English teams are not banned from Europe in the mid 1980s, and Everton continue their dominance into the 1990s and beyond.

I'll expand it a little:

With Harry Catterick leaving Everton in the summer of 1971 in a blaze of glory, having reached the European Cup Final, though losing 2 – 1 to Ajax, and brought the F. A. Cup back to Merseyside, there were some who wondered if Everton could continue their dominance, especially with League Champions Arsenal emerging as a powerful force. However, Sir John Moores again proved himself to be a good judge of character by persuading the controversial Derby County manager, Brian Clough, to leave County for Goodison Park.

Clough persuaded Moores to raid his old club for Roy McFarland to replace the ageing stalwart Brian Labone, who retired later that year. Clough was happy to appoint Archie Gemmill as captain, having almost signed Gemmill for Derby before the Scot opted for the then reigning champions in 1970.


In the following year, Clough managed to persuade Peter Shilton to join Everton. This was a key factor in Everton beating their neighbours Liverpool to the title in 1972/73. Clough performed another masterstroke in signing the Birmingham City pair of Trevor Francis and Bob Latchford for a British record combined fee of £800,000 in 1974, though the fee included two Everton favourites, Howard Kendall and Joe Royle, going the other way.

By the mid 1970s, Manchester United were in Division 2, Arsenal were in decline, Leeds United's team was growing old together, and Liverpool were unable to emerge from their neighbours' shadow, with Clough proving more newsworthy than even Bill Shankly. Everton were the dominant team in England, and were becoming more and more of a threat to the top European sides.



1975/76 proved to be an important season in Everton's history. Having won the League the previous year, they were determined to launch another assault on Europe. This was accomplished in stunning fashion when they won the European Cup in 1976, defeating the West German champions, Bayern Munich, in the Final. Latchford and Francis were terrorising defences, each claiming over 20 goals in domestic football alone. However, the winning goal in the European Cup final was scored by the substitute, local lad Mick Lyons. Everton scored a memorable double, also winning the F. A. Cup that season, defeating Newcastle United 3 - 0 in a remarkably one-sided game.


1976-77 started well for Everton, the Blues remaining undefeated until the penultimate game of 1976. However, the success was, to some extent, their undoing, as the squad proved too small to cope with the demands of going for four competitions. As it was, Everton lost in the semi-final of the League Cup to neighbours Liverpool - the reds' first victory against Everton for four years - and were eliminated from Europe by A. C. Milan in the quarter-final. Resurgent Manchester United knocked out Everton in the sixth round of the F. A. Cup, but a late run of seven victories in the last eight games gave Everton the major consolation of another League Championship, overtaking Manchester City in the final straight.

There were rumours of tension between the Board and the Manager, and these rumours intensified when Clough did not appear on the team's triumphant tour of the City with the Championship trophy. Nevertheless, Clough was permitted to splash out again, bringing in England international Colin Todd to bolster the Blues' defence, while Andy King was introduced to add goals to Everton's midfield.

More success followed, with Everton winning the League Cup for the first time in February 1978. The League title went to the wire, but Everton lost out to Manchester United, though any disappointment was soon forgotten when Everton lifted the European Cup again, beating Italian champions Juventus 2 - 0.


The summer of 1978 produced a bombshell at Goodison Park with the sudden and mysterious resignation of Brian Clough. Even now, over 30 years later, the full story is not known. The generally accepted theory is that Clough fell out with Chairman Sir John Moores over footballing matters, though rumours persist that the basis of the disagreements was Clough's unwillingness to tone down his open statement of support for the Labour Party. There were protests at Goodison Park and even a mass demonstration through the city calling for Clough to return. Threats of fans refusing to attend the first home league game were made but no significant boycott was carried out.

The Board moved quickly to appoint a successor to Clough, handing the post to Gordon Lee, the man who had revitalised Newcastle United. Lee enjoyed a reasonable first season, leading his team to another Wembley victory when they retained the League Cup, though the European campaign ended at an unexpectedly early stage. Losing in the semi-final of the F. A. Cup to neighbours Liverpool was a blow, albeit following highly dubious decisions by referee Clive Thomas, who awarded Liverpool two penalties for offences which no-one else saw. Liverpool, who beat WBA in the final, thus won their first trophy since 1966, and Bob Paisley at last emerged from the shadow of the man whom he had succeeded as manager three years earlier. Ipswich Town unexpectedly won the League, manager Bobby Robson thus emulating the feat of Alf Ramsey, and being tipped as a future England manager.

Robson proved that Ipswich's title win was no fluke by repeating the feat in 1979/80, while the Cup was won by Arsenal. Everton were prevented from winning the League Cup for the third year running by Aston Villa, who defeated the Merseysiders 2 - 1 in a replay after a 2 - 2 draw at Wembley.

Lee's reign at Everton came to an end early in 1981, following Everton's elimination from the F. A. Cup by Blackburn Rovers of Division 2.

Parts II & III to follow tomorrow.
 

BlueIsTheColour

Player Valuation: £6m
Alan Myers insider view of that day. What a horrendous occasion it was.

http://www.theblueroomefc.com/2017/02/22/alan-myers-coventry-98-day-forget-day-remember/

we will forever owe a debt of gratitude to Chelsea for doing the business vs Bolton, crazy that it wasn't even in our hands going into the last match, at least in '94 we knew if we beat Wimbledon we would be safe but having to rely on others makes it even closer of a shave to going down. Lucky Hans Seagers wasn't in goal for Chelsea that ay is all I can say!
 

davek

Player Valuation: £70m
we will forever owe a debt of gratitude to Chelsea for doing the business vs Bolton, crazy that it wasn't even in our hands going into the last match, at least in '94 we knew if we beat Wimbledon we would be safe but having to rely on others makes it even closer of a shave to going down. Lucky Hans Seagers wasn't in goal for Chelsea that ay is all I can say!
If it'd have been the other way around I'd have wanted Everton to cave in to Bolton. So yeah, we owe Chelsea and Vialli in particular.
 

summerisle

The rain, it raineth every day
An interesting read about Tony Kay.

http://www.byfarthegreatestteam.com/posts/crime-and-punishment/?utm_content=bufferd6beb&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Crime and Punishment

Suddenly betting in football is a hot topic again this week. Firstly, Sutton United’s deputy goalkeeper Wayne Shaw has wrecked the integrity of the FA Cup by eating a pie. Secondly, Cowdenbeath player Dean Brett has been suspended after admitting betting on his own team to lose. And then there is the unresolved saga of Joey Barton and multiple bets he is alleged to have staked on a number of English and Scottish games.

The decision of Sutton United to ask for Wayne Shaw’s resignation has provoked a storm on social media, with many commentators calling for draconian action. However, others such as Piers Morgan, taking a break from haranguing Arsene on Twitter, have demanded that it be seen as a light hearted joke and nothing more and that football has lost its sense of humour.

However, a certain Tony Kay would have been watching these latest developments with interest. Let me explain.

The 1962/63 season was my first year of watching Everton and at the end of the season, we were league champions for the first time since 1939. Most Everton fans credited the signing the manager, Harry Catterick, had made in December as being the final piece in the jigsaw. He had swiftly become one of my dad’s favourite players, no mean feat, when the competition included Alex Young, Roy Vernon, Brian Labone and Gordon West. That man was Anthony (Tony) Kay.

During the close season, my Dad took me to Goodison Park to buy some programmes from one of the shops near the ground. As a treat, he bought me an autograph book. He challenged me to get an autograph. As we walked past the stadium, a car pulled up by the player’s entrance and a mad scrum of street urchins scrambled towards it. A player with striking red hair and sunglasses smiled as he signed the tens of autograph books thrust in front of him. One of them was mine. I had managed to get my first ever autograph. The illegible scrawl belonged to a certain Tony Kay.

Tony Kay only played for Everton for a period of seventeen months, from December 1962 until April 1964. Yet amongst Evertonians of a certain generation he is still regarded as one of the club’s best ever midfield players, which is some statement when the competition is the Holy Trinity of Ball, Kendall and Harvey. Next month, there is yet another event organised to celebrate his contribution to the proud history of Everton. Sadly, to most people however, he is remembered as one of the three players whose careers were ended due to the football bribery scandal, exposed by the Sunday People in April 1964.

Tony Kay was born in Sheffield and made his debut for Sheffield Wednesday in 1954 and went on to play 179 games for the Owls, scoring 10 goals. Kay was a part of the teams that won promotion to the top division on two occasions, in the 1955/56 and the 1958/59 seasons. They also finished runners up in Division One to Tottenham in 1960/61, their highest position since 1930. In fact if the manager Harry Catterick had not left for Everton in April, just before a crucial game with Tottenham, they may have just pipped them for the league.

At the age of 26, Tony Kay signed for Everton in December 1962 for a very substantial fee of £60,000, which at the time was a British record for a wing half. As he had already played for Harry Catterick when he was manager of Sheffield Wednesday, it was obvious that Harry saw him as the final piece in the jigsaw to mount a bid to win the league. It was no secret that Catterick wanted to sign his midfield general for Everton, it was also no secret that the Owls did not want to sell him. Eventually Catterick’s persistence and John Moore’s financial support enabled the deal to be completed. At the time, due to John Moore’s final backing, Everton had the moniker of the “Mersey Millionaires”

Due to the extreme winter conditions, fans at Goodison had to wait until February for their first glimpse of the new signing. Initially, Kay replaced crowd favourite Brian Harris as the left sided wing half, but with a combination of fierce tackling and an eye for a pass, he soon won the crowd over. Kay brought experience and leadership to the team and Catterick had bought a man he could trust to carry out his orders. The league championship after a gap of twenty four years was a fitting reward.

Life was looking good for Tony Kay in the summer of 1963. Many fans were expecting him to assume the captaincy of Everton. He had a European Cup campaign to look forward to. Everton were many pundits’ favourites to retain the title as Catterick added reinforcements to his squad. And Kay, received his first full international call up, being picked to play for England away in Switzerland. With the World Cup still three years away and with places up for grabs, Kay did himself no harm by scoring on his debut in an 8-1 victory. Kay is still one of the few players to have scored on their England debut and who were never to be selected again!

Early on during the 1963/64 season, Catterick replaced the experienced Roy Vernon as captain with Kay as Everton’s defence of the title started to stutter. Everton remained in with a chance of retaining the title until the events and revelations of April 1964 conspired against them and an action in which Everton had no direct involvement destroyed the season and Tony Kay’s career.

In April 1964, the Sunday People ran a sensational story which rocked the foundations of English League football. It alleged that it had evidence that certain top flight players had been bribed to lose matches. It was ready to reveal the names of those involved. Little did Everton or Tony Kay realise the impact that this was about to have and the effect it was to have on both of them.

Three Sheffield Wednesday players, Tony Kay, Bronco Layne and Peter Swan were found guilty of bribery and conspiring to fix a match. They had bet on their own team losing a game away to Ipswich. They each made £150 as part of the scam. However, in a bizarre twist of fate, the Sunday People which had exposed the scandal also had given Tony Kay their man of the match award for the game!

Tony and the others were not quite prepared for the severity of the punishment which the outraged FA was about to administer. Everton took the immediate step of suspending Kay from playing whilst the legal process ran its course. One year later in April 1965, the judgements were delivered.

Each player received a fine of £150 and four month prison sentence. However, worse was to follow as staggeringly they were banned from playing professional football sine die. In other words they could never play professional football again. At the age of 28, Tony Kay’s football career was over. All for the sake of a £150 bet. He never played professional football again. When the ban was eventually rescinded in 1974, Kay was too old to even consider a top level comeback after nine years out of the game.

Looking back, the harshness of the punishments meted out defies any sort of logic. Contrary to any form of natural justice, Tony Kay was punished three times for the same offence. Both Luke McCormick of Plymouth Argyle and Lee Hughes, ex-West Brom, were welcomed back into the games with open arms, despite their driving resulting in the deaths of innocent passengers and pedestrians. Tony Kay did not cause anybody to die.

A few years later, in the Bundesliga in West Germany, in 1971 a massive bribery scandal was exposed in which a number of players were players convicted of being paid substantial sums of money to lose matches. However, within three years they were back playing football again. If the FA had treated the case the same way, Kay could possibly have played for the Everton Championship winning side of 69/70

Of course Everton were the victims in this as well. They had paid £55,000 for someone who only played for the team for just under sixteen months and they were not entitled to any money back. Even worse, Everton were the completely innocent party in all of this. Kay was not even their player at the time of the offence. Kay had been vital to Catterick’s style of play. Catterick openly discussed the devastating effect this had on his plans for Everton’s development. Without him at the heart of the team, Everton would wait seven years for their next championship as another nearby recently promoted team started to gather momentum. Not for the first time in Everton’s history was a Championship winning side to be severely punished for the actions of other clubs.

Tony Kay is now seventy nine and one of the surviving members of that 1962/63 team. He has lived on Merseyside for the last decade and is supported by the excellent Everton Former Players Association. He also has a Twitter account @winghalf6 which post some fabulous photos from the football of the Sixties. It is well worth a look. He always responds to comments from supporters of both clubs. He often helps out at a local coffee shop in Southport which he has adorned with Everton memorabilia.

Amidst all the heated debate about the rights and wrongs of “piegate” and whatever punishment the FA decide to deliver to Wayne Shaw, I guarantee it will be nothing like as severe as the sanctions received by Tony Kay.
 

Paul w

Banned
Banned
An interesting read about Tony Kay.

http://www.byfarthegreatestteam.com/posts/crime-and-punishment/?utm_content=bufferd6beb&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Crime and Punishment

Suddenly betting in football is a hot topic again this week. Firstly, Sutton United’s deputy goalkeeper Wayne Shaw has wrecked the integrity of the FA Cup by eating a pie. Secondly, Cowdenbeath player Dean Brett has been suspended after admitting betting on his own team to lose. And then there is the unresolved saga of Joey Barton and multiple bets he is alleged to have staked on a number of English and Scottish games.

The decision of Sutton United to ask for Wayne Shaw’s resignation has provoked a storm on social media, with many commentators calling for draconian action. However, others such as Piers Morgan, taking a break from haranguing Arsene on Twitter, have demanded that it be seen as a light hearted joke and nothing more and that football has lost its sense of humour.

However, a certain Tony Kay would have been watching these latest developments with interest. Let me explain.

The 1962/63 season was my first year of watching Everton and at the end of the season, we were league champions for the first time since 1939. Most Everton fans credited the signing the manager, Harry Catterick, had made in December as being the final piece in the jigsaw. He had swiftly become one of my dad’s favourite players, no mean feat, when the competition included Alex Young, Roy Vernon, Brian Labone and Gordon West. That man was Anthony (Tony) Kay.

During the close season, my Dad took me to Goodison Park to buy some programmes from one of the shops near the ground. As a treat, he bought me an autograph book. He challenged me to get an autograph. As we walked past the stadium, a car pulled up by the player’s entrance and a mad scrum of street urchins scrambled towards it. A player with striking red hair and sunglasses smiled as he signed the tens of autograph books thrust in front of him. One of them was mine. I had managed to get my first ever autograph. The illegible scrawl belonged to a certain Tony Kay.

Tony Kay only played for Everton for a period of seventeen months, from December 1962 until April 1964. Yet amongst Evertonians of a certain generation he is still regarded as one of the club’s best ever midfield players, which is some statement when the competition is the Holy Trinity of Ball, Kendall and Harvey. Next month, there is yet another event organised to celebrate his contribution to the proud history of Everton. Sadly, to most people however, he is remembered as one of the three players whose careers were ended due to the football bribery scandal, exposed by the Sunday People in April 1964.

Tony Kay was born in Sheffield and made his debut for Sheffield Wednesday in 1954 and went on to play 179 games for the Owls, scoring 10 goals. Kay was a part of the teams that won promotion to the top division on two occasions, in the 1955/56 and the 1958/59 seasons. They also finished runners up in Division One to Tottenham in 1960/61, their highest position since 1930. In fact if the manager Harry Catterick had not left for Everton in April, just before a crucial game with Tottenham, they may have just pipped them for the league.

At the age of 26, Tony Kay signed for Everton in December 1962 for a very substantial fee of £60,000, which at the time was a British record for a wing half. As he had already played for Harry Catterick when he was manager of Sheffield Wednesday, it was obvious that Harry saw him as the final piece in the jigsaw to mount a bid to win the league. It was no secret that Catterick wanted to sign his midfield general for Everton, it was also no secret that the Owls did not want to sell him. Eventually Catterick’s persistence and John Moore’s financial support enabled the deal to be completed. At the time, due to John Moore’s final backing, Everton had the moniker of the “Mersey Millionaires”

Due to the extreme winter conditions, fans at Goodison had to wait until February for their first glimpse of the new signing. Initially, Kay replaced crowd favourite Brian Harris as the left sided wing half, but with a combination of fierce tackling and an eye for a pass, he soon won the crowd over. Kay brought experience and leadership to the team and Catterick had bought a man he could trust to carry out his orders. The league championship after a gap of twenty four years was a fitting reward.

Life was looking good for Tony Kay in the summer of 1963. Many fans were expecting him to assume the captaincy of Everton. He had a European Cup campaign to look forward to. Everton were many pundits’ favourites to retain the title as Catterick added reinforcements to his squad. And Kay, received his first full international call up, being picked to play for England away in Switzerland. With the World Cup still three years away and with places up for grabs, Kay did himself no harm by scoring on his debut in an 8-1 victory. Kay is still one of the few players to have scored on their England debut and who were never to be selected again!

Early on during the 1963/64 season, Catterick replaced the experienced Roy Vernon as captain with Kay as Everton’s defence of the title started to stutter. Everton remained in with a chance of retaining the title until the events and revelations of April 1964 conspired against them and an action in which Everton had no direct involvement destroyed the season and Tony Kay’s career.

In April 1964, the Sunday People ran a sensational story which rocked the foundations of English League football. It alleged that it had evidence that certain top flight players had been bribed to lose matches. It was ready to reveal the names of those involved. Little did Everton or Tony Kay realise the impact that this was about to have and the effect it was to have on both of them.

Three Sheffield Wednesday players, Tony Kay, Bronco Layne and Peter Swan were found guilty of bribery and conspiring to fix a match. They had bet on their own team losing a game away to Ipswich. They each made £150 as part of the scam. However, in a bizarre twist of fate, the Sunday People which had exposed the scandal also had given Tony Kay their man of the match award for the game!

Tony and the others were not quite prepared for the severity of the punishment which the outraged FA was about to administer. Everton took the immediate step of suspending Kay from playing whilst the legal process ran its course. One year later in April 1965, the judgements were delivered.

Each player received a fine of £150 and four month prison sentence. However, worse was to follow as staggeringly they were banned from playing professional football sine die. In other words they could never play professional football again. At the age of 28, Tony Kay’s football career was over. All for the sake of a £150 bet. He never played professional football again. When the ban was eventually rescinded in 1974, Kay was too old to even consider a top level comeback after nine years out of the game.

Looking back, the harshness of the punishments meted out defies any sort of logic. Contrary to any form of natural justice, Tony Kay was punished three times for the same offence. Both Luke McCormick of Plymouth Argyle and Lee Hughes, ex-West Brom, were welcomed back into the games with open arms, despite their driving resulting in the deaths of innocent passengers and pedestrians. Tony Kay did not cause anybody to die.

A few years later, in the Bundesliga in West Germany, in 1971 a massive bribery scandal was exposed in which a number of players were players convicted of being paid substantial sums of money to lose matches. However, within three years they were back playing football again. If the FA had treated the case the same way, Kay could possibly have played for the Everton Championship winning side of 69/70

Of course Everton were the victims in this as well. They had paid £55,000 for someone who only played for the team for just under sixteen months and they were not entitled to any money back. Even worse, Everton were the completely innocent party in all of this. Kay was not even their player at the time of the offence. Kay had been vital to Catterick’s style of play. Catterick openly discussed the devastating effect this had on his plans for Everton’s development. Without him at the heart of the team, Everton would wait seven years for their next championship as another nearby recently promoted team started to gather momentum. Not for the first time in Everton’s history was a Championship winning side to be severely punished for the actions of other clubs.

Tony Kay is now seventy nine and one of the surviving members of that 1962/63 team. He has lived on Merseyside for the last decade and is supported by the excellent Everton Former Players Association. He also has a Twitter account @winghalf6 which post some fabulous photos from the football of the Sixties. It is well worth a look. He always responds to comments from supporters of both clubs. He often helps out at a local coffee shop in Southport which he has adorned with Everton memorabilia.

Amidst all the heated debate about the rights and wrongs of “piegate” and whatever punishment the FA decide to deliver to Wayne Shaw, I guarantee it will be nothing like as severe as the sanctions received by Tony Kay.
My old fella adoured tony Kay,always used to say to me Bobby Moore would never have captain england if it wasn't for Kay's ban,he said Tony would of gone on to be one of the greats of English football,but will never know.
 

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