January 2019 Transfer Window


Zatara

Player Valuation: £70m
Any idea who the 9 are can’t get through the paywall
Neither can i...this is from a dodgy site


The newspaper claim the loan exit to Cardiff City of Oumar Niasse on Friday morning heralded the start of a mass overhaul of the deadwood brought in during the Farhad Moshiri era. The Times report Morgan Schneiderlin, Cenk Tosun and loaned-out Yannick Bolasie, Sandro Ramírez, Kevin Mirallas, Cuco Martina and Nikola Vlasic and Ashley Williams are all up for sale this month amid Niasse’s exit.
 

The binman chronicles

Player Valuation: £70m
Neither can i...this is from a dodgy site


The newspaper claim the loan exit to Cardiff City of Oumar Niasse on Friday morning heralded the start of a mass overhaul of the deadwood brought in during the Farhad Moshiri era. The Times report Morgan Schneiderlin, Cenk Tosun and loaned-out Yannick Bolasie, Sandro Ramírez, Kevin Mirallas, Cuco Martina and Nikola Vlasic and Ashley Williams are all up for sale this month amid Niasse’s exit.
That's like the worst jumble sale you have ever been to. Can't be Williams though, he is a free agent.
 

Nymzee

Player Valuation: £70m
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/reckless-spending-under-ronald-koeman-and-sam-allardyce-continues-to-undermine-evertons-progress-gcmdm506l

Marcel Brands, the Everton director of football, never leaves his seat at half-time during matches. While all the other directors and high rollers head inside for refreshments and chit-chat, the Dutchman remains steadfastly in position.

So against Bournemouth last Sunday after an insipid 45 minutes which would belatedly pick up for the hosts, he stood alone and watched an Everton supporter from Ireland try the crossbar challenge.

Miss, miss, miss. No change there then.

With the final week of the transfer window approaching, it might have been a good time to offer Brands a penny for this thoughts because he will be hoping to be busy.

Not necessarily on incomings, despite the desperate need for a striker and a midfielder, but on chopping back some more of the deadwood that continues to block the way forward for Everton.


The departure of Oumar Niasse to Cardiff City on loan, which was announced this morning, has begun the purge of around £100 million worth of talent that remains available in the last vestiges of the January sales. Morgan Schneiderlin and Cenk Tosun find themselves on the fringes of Marco Silva’s plans, while Yannick Bolasie, Sandro Ramírez, Kevin Mirallas, Cuco Martina and Nikola Vlasic are among those on loan (Ashley Williams is, too, but his contract expires in the summer).

As for that £100 million figure above, remember that that is the amount Everton lavished on recruiting players, who have quickly found themselves surplus to requirements, rather than the amount the club would expect to recoup if there is to be some serious bloodletting.

And that is an issue for Brands and therefore Silva, who said yesterday that he has been informed by the board the “financial conditions” are not right to go into the market.

That could refer to there being little value in incoming deals in January and that the summer is the time when Everton will be shopping. Brands has suggested that is a strategy he favours.

But Silva’s comments also allude to a situation where the club must sell to buy. One (or two) out, one in.

None of the above mentioned players have added value to their price tags and if Everton rake in around £60 million for that cluster of players, Brands will be deserving of more than just a place on the Goodison Park board.

Even then, £60 million will probably only just cover the cost of keeping two key players — Kurt Zouma and André Gomes — at a team tenth in the table beyond their season-long loans.

If that proves possible. Zouma, who will make his 100th Premier League appearance when he faces Southampton tomorrow, has already stated he hopes to return to Chelsea and prove himself there.

There are three ways in which clubs can overhaul squads in order to develop.

Firstly, sell to buy which, as outlined, does not really work in this case unless Everton start offloading players who have not been pushed on to the periphery.

But £40 million Gylfi Sigurdsson, and £20 million Theo Walcott, have disappointed and not added to their value either. The idea is to build around Richarlison, not hawk him elsewhere inside 12 months.

Replenishing from within can be a second method, but it does not appear there is a posse of youngsters ready to emerge from the academy and demand Silva picks them.

The third way is to get the begging bowl out to a benevolent owner, although the billionaire Farhad Moshiri was hoping the club would be rather more self-sustainable having already pumped in £250 million of his fortune.

The sharper the scrutiny on how that money was spent, the more it can be said the excesses of Brands’ predecessor, Steve Walsh, and managers Ronald Koeman and Sam Allardyce did not just undermine progress at the time but continue to do so.

The legacy of waste is appalling with Davy Klaassen, bought for £24 million and sold to Werder Bremen for £12 million within 12 months after three Premier League starts, a prime example of reckless spending.

It is no wonder that, at last week’s general meeting of shareholders, there was a desire from the top table to simply gloss over that period and focus on the future.

Everton must be mindful of Financial Fair Play rules, but it is hard to see how Moshiri does not have to rummage around deep pockets at some point once again even with a £500 million Bramley Moore Dock stadium project running in the background.

Recruitment, bringing in the right talent, is the most difficult aspect of any business and in those quiet moments during the interval Brands will doubtless reflect on that.

Of this summer’s permanent signings, Lucas Digne has done well, Richarlison, too. Yerry Mina and Bernard less so but it is early days.

Everton want Brands to be “smarter” than the rest, and the reputation he forged in the Netherlands with AZ Alkmaar and then PSV Eindhoven is glowing. But there is no magic wand.

Across Stanley Park, Liverpool wanted the same of their recruitment team before eventually realising the merit of also spending £75 million on Virgil van Dijk and £65 million on Alisson.

Liverpool, too, sold and bought, but only players who pushed to leave (Luis Suárez, Raheem Sterling and Philippe Coutinho) and/or had added to their value. They invested the proceeds well, helped by the club’s status.

The reality is Brands might struggle to be consistently smarter than the clubs Everton want to perceive as their rivals, especially when the club also talks about wanting to keep wages in check.

Being better than what went before is an altogether easier task.
 

davek

Player Valuation: £70m
Its more important to you to sell crap like Bolasie and Besic, than bringing in a top player in Digne?

dave you're making yourself seem very silly with this anti-brands stuff.
If you dont possess the ability to sell those "crap" players then you dont (in this new Everton spending model) get to bring players in.

Brands' inability to sell is now a major problem given we sell to buy. I would have thought THAT point was obvious.
 

toffeejack

Player Valuation: £70m
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/reckless-spending-under-ronald-koeman-and-sam-allardyce-continues-to-undermine-evertons-progress-gcmdm506l

Marcel Brands, the Everton director of football, never leaves his seat at half-time during matches. While all the other directors and high rollers head inside for refreshments and chit-chat, the Dutchman remains steadfastly in position.

So against Bournemouth last Sunday after an insipid 45 minutes which would belatedly pick up for the hosts, he stood alone and watched an Everton supporter from Ireland try the crossbar challenge.

Miss, miss, miss. No change there then.

With the final week of the transfer window approaching, it might have been a good time to offer Brands a penny for this thoughts because he will be hoping to be busy.

Not necessarily on incomings, despite the desperate need for a striker and a midfielder, but on chopping back some more of the deadwood that continues to block the way forward for Everton.


The departure of Oumar Niasse to Cardiff City on loan, which was announced this morning, has begun the purge of around £100 million worth of talent that remains available in the last vestiges of the January sales. Morgan Schneiderlin and Cenk Tosun find themselves on the fringes of Marco Silva’s plans, while Yannick Bolasie, Sandro Ramírez, Kevin Mirallas, Cuco Martina and Nikola Vlasic are among those on loan (Ashley Williams is, too, but his contract expires in the summer).

As for that £100 million figure above, remember that that is the amount Everton lavished on recruiting players, who have quickly found themselves surplus to requirements, rather than the amount the club would expect to recoup if there is to be some serious bloodletting.

And that is an issue for Brands and therefore Silva, who said yesterday that he has been informed by the board the “financial conditions” are not right to go into the market.

That could refer to there being little value in incoming deals in January and that the summer is the time when Everton will be shopping. Brands has suggested that is a strategy he favours.

But Silva’s comments also allude to a situation where the club must sell to buy. One (or two) out, one in.

None of the above mentioned players have added value to their price tags and if Everton rake in around £60 million for that cluster of players, Brands will be deserving of more than just a place on the Goodison Park board.

Even then, £60 million will probably only just cover the cost of keeping two key players — Kurt Zouma and André Gomes — at a team tenth in the table beyond their season-long loans.

If that proves possible. Zouma, who will make his 100th Premier League appearance when he faces Southampton tomorrow, has already stated he hopes to return to Chelsea and prove himself there.

There are three ways in which clubs can overhaul squads in order to develop.

Firstly, sell to buy which, as outlined, does not really work in this case unless Everton start offloading players who have not been pushed on to the periphery.

But £40 million Gylfi Sigurdsson, and £20 million Theo Walcott, have disappointed and not added to their value either. The idea is to build around Richarlison, not hawk him elsewhere inside 12 months.

Replenishing from within can be a second method, but it does not appear there is a posse of youngsters ready to emerge from the academy and demand Silva picks them.

The third way is to get the begging bowl out to a benevolent owner, although the billionaire Farhad Moshiri was hoping the club would be rather more self-sustainable having already pumped in £250 million of his fortune.

The sharper the scrutiny on how that money was spent, the more it can be said the excesses of Brands’ predecessor, Steve Walsh, and managers Ronald Koeman and Sam Allardyce did not just undermine progress at the time but continue to do so.

The legacy of waste is appalling with Davy Klaassen, bought for £24 million and sold to Werder Bremen for £12 million within 12 months after three Premier League starts, a prime example of reckless spending.

It is no wonder that, at last week’s general meeting of shareholders, there was a desire from the top table to simply gloss over that period and focus on the future.

Everton must be mindful of Financial Fair Play rules, but it is hard to see how Moshiri does not have to rummage around deep pockets at some point once again even with a £500 million Bramley Moore Dock stadium project running in the background.

Recruitment, bringing in the right talent, is the most difficult aspect of any business and in those quiet moments during the interval Brands will doubtless reflect on that.

Of this summer’s permanent signings, Lucas Digne has done well, Richarlison, too. Yerry Mina and Bernard less so but it is early days.

Everton want Brands to be “smarter” than the rest, and the reputation he forged in the Netherlands with AZ Alkmaar and then PSV Eindhoven is glowing. But there is no magic wand.

Across Stanley Park, Liverpool wanted the same of their recruitment team before eventually realising the merit of also spending £75 million on Virgil van Dijk and £65 million on Alisson.

Liverpool, too, sold and bought, but only players who pushed to leave (Luis Suárez, Raheem Sterling and Philippe Coutinho) and/or had added to their value. They invested the proceeds well, helped by the club’s status.

The reality is Brands might struggle to be consistently smarter than the clubs Everton want to perceive as their rivals, especially when the club also talks about wanting to keep wages in check.

Being better than what went before is an altogether easier task.
I'm sorry but that article sucks. Anyone can see the points they got right, but I'm 100% sure we didn't buy siggurdsson and Walcott to raise their value and sell for a profit, that's utter nonsense.

"does not appear to be a posse of youngsters" haha eff me, half of our team are youngsters who are only going to improve, we're top of the u23 league and top of the u18 league, there'll be a few squad players and sales to come from that lot. I bet this reporter is the type to say "man City have a great future because of foden".

I think we'll have a good budget again in the summer, this article is making it sound like if we get £60m from those players.... That will be our budget.
 

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